Wednesday, October 16, 2019

A Buddhist monk (Dalai lama) hugging an American nun.


image
His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Venerable Thubten Chodron
“His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Ven. Thubten Chodron continue to give generously to the Buddhist community, and in particular to the community of Western Buddhist practitioners. This fourth volume in the magnificent Library of Wisdom and Compassion maintains the high standards set in the first three: it is comprehensive without sacrificing relevant detail, it is precise without sacrificing accessibility, and it is of enormous value to practitioners and teachers but still of great interest to scholars of Buddhism.”
—Jay L. Garfield, Doris Silbert Professor in the Humanities, Smith College and the Harvard Divinity School

The Library of Wisdom and Compassion is a special multivolume series in which His Holiness the Dalai Lama shares the Buddha’s teachings on the complete path to full awakening that he himself has practiced his entire life. The topics are arranged especially for people seeking practical spiritual advice and are peppered with the Dalai Lama’s own unique outlook. Assisted by his long-term disciple, the American nun Thubten Chodron, the Dalai Lama sets the context for practicing the Buddha’s teachings in modern times and then unveils the path of wisdom and compassion that leads to a meaningful life and sense of personal fulfillment. This series is an important bridge from introductory to profound topics for those seeking an in-depth explanation from a contemporary perspective.
If you’re a member of the Wisdom Experience you can read many of the volumes in The Library of Wisdom and Compassion now in the Reading Room, and we’re working on getting the rest added. 

Re: B.sujato translates 'metta' as 'love'. That's horrible, and it's wrong.

Post by frank k » Wed Oct 16, 2019 6:10 am
Nicolas wrote: 
Mon Jul 22, 2019 3:08 am
What about “universal love”?
As a translation for 'metta', 'universal love' is better than 'loving kindness', but still problematic.
B. Sujato's translation of 'metta' as 'love' is beyond problematic and wrong, it's horrible.
Here's an example of why.

Buddhist monk (Dalai lama) hugging an American nun.
https://notesonthedhamma.blogspot.com/2 ... ging.html

Lots of skin to skin contact here as far as I can tell from the picture.
Too much 'loving-kindness' here (Dalai lama's usual translation for 'metta').

Sunday, October 13, 2019

KN (the EBT portion): every single vitakka reference highlighted, with hyperlink to sutta in pali and english


KN

Monday, October 7, 2019

AN: every reference to vitakka in there (162 hits) with links directly to sutta passage


AN (162 hits)

Friday, October 4, 2019

Why does B. Sujato translate the khattiya class as "aristocrat"? "Warrior" seems to be the standard translation.

The Caste System (Brahmin and Kshatriya) Summary: ... The system of classification, Varna is a system that existed in the Vedic Society that divided the society into four classes Brahmins (priests), Kshatriyas (warriors), Vaishyas (skilled traders, merchants), and Shudras (unskilled workers).Nov 25, 2015
The Caste System (Brahmin and Kshatriya) – Religion 100Q ...

https://scholarblogs.emory.edu › 2015/11/25 › the-caste-system-brahmin-an...


Explanation: khattiya : [m.] a man of the warrior caste. (adj.),to belonging Khattiyas. || khattiyā (f.), a woman of the Khattiya clan.
khattiya - Dictionary | Buddhistdoor

https://www.buddhistdoor.net › dictionary › details › khattiya


MN 96 (b.sujato) (4 castes hierarchy explained here)

“brāhmaṇā, bho gotama, catasso pāricariyā paññapenti—
“Master Gotama, the brahmins prescribe four kinds of service:
brāhmaṇassa pāricariyaṃ paññapenti, khattiyassa pāricariyaṃ paññapenti, vessassa pāricariyaṃ paññapenti, suddassa pāricariyaṃ paññapenti.
for a brahmin, an aristocrat, a merchant, and a worker.
Tatridaṃ, bho gotama, brāhmaṇā brāhmaṇassa pāricariyaṃ paññapenti:
This is the service they prescribe for a brahmin:
‘brāhmaṇo vā brāhmaṇaṃ paricareyya, khattiyo vā brāhmaṇaṃ paricareyya, vesso vā brāhmaṇaṃ paricareyya, suddo vā brāhmaṇaṃ paricareyyā’ti.
‘A brahmin, an aristocrat, a merchant, and a worker may all serve a brahmin.’
Idaṃ kho, bho gotama, brāhmaṇā brāhmaṇassa pāricariyaṃ paññapenti.
Tatridaṃ, bho gotama, brāhmaṇā khattiyassa pāricariyaṃ paññapenti:
This is the service they prescribe for an aristocrat:
‘khattiyo vā khattiyaṃ paricareyya, vesso vā khattiyaṃ paricareyya, suddo vā khattiyaṃ paricareyyā’ti.
‘An aristocrat, a merchant, and a worker may all serve an aristocrat.’

AN 11.10 (b.sujato trans.) 

Khattiyo seṭṭho janetasmiṃ,
‘The aristocrat is best of those people
ye gottapaṭisārino;
who take clan as the standard.
Vijjācaraṇasampanno,
But one accomplished in knowledge and conduct
so seṭṭho devamānuse’”ti.
Is best of gods and humans.’”    


Re: Why does B. Sujato translate the khattiya class as "aristocrat"? "Warrior" seems to be the standard translation.

Post by frank k » Sat Oct 05, 2019 6:46 am
Bhikkhu Pesala wrote: 
Fri Oct 04, 2019 9:25 am
It is not a bad translation. Possibly better than the widely used “warrior.”

Khattiya were kings and rulers.
I can't think of what sutta at the moment, but I recall a passage saying something to the effect that the khattiya (warrior) class was the best, because of the mental toughness, the tenacity, the ability to face extreme adversity. The concept of 'warrior' matches that perfectly. The concept of 'nobleman' or 'aristocrat' brings to mind a fat cat hiding in his castle and ordering his servants and soldiers to do the hard work.


ar·is·toc·ra·cy

/ˌerəˈstäkrəsē/
noun
the highest class in certain societies, especially those holding hereditary titles or offices.
"the ancient Polish aristocracy had hereditary right to elect the king"
synonyms: the nobility, the peerage, the gentry, the upper class, the ruling class, the privileged class, the elite, high society, the establishment, the patriciate, the haut monde, the beau monde; More
a form of government in which power is held by the nobility.
a state governed by the aristocracy.
plural noun: aristocracies


A friend responded:
Hello Frank,
I did a little look-up in O.E.D.
Aristocracy is a Greek origin compound meaning best-rule. The rule part,
cracy, it would be my bet, is related to khattiya; but that is not
official. But the word Aristocrat, does not come directly from the
Greek, but from the French, coined during the French Revolution to
distinguish between Democracy and the oligarchic aristocracy that
previously ruled thinking themselves the best to rule.
I have used 'aristocrat' for 'ariya' where it indicates noble behavior
(as in the ariya atthangika magga), because that must be the origin of
the 'aristo' part, that is: 'worthy' which is close enough to 'best'.
And aristocratic is in common usage as indicating noble behavior.
The fact is that the khattiya were the rulers, though the kings often
delegated administration of towns and lands to the brahmins. This was
pretty standard throughout the world until the American and French
Revolutions. That is that the warriors were also the bosses.
And I think the four colors business is actually a reasonable way
hierarchies in human populations develop. Here we have 'politicians and
the military', 'academics and preachers', 'merchants' and 'workers'.
The truest translation would be 'warrior' but that does not convey today
the idea of rule, whereas 'aristocrat' does. And again looking back at
the history, the aristocrat class did emerge from the warriors.
Conclusion: Aristocrat for khattiya is reasonable. 

Re: Why does B. Sujato translate the khattiya class as "aristocrat"? "Warrior" seems to be the standard translation.

Post by frank k » Mon Oct 07, 2019 7:24 am
Is there a way to set up a vote on dhammawheel forum software?

I propose these as better translations for khattiya:

warrior-kings
warrior-rulers
warrior-noblemen
warrior-nobles

the word 'Dhamma' needs to be untranslated, here's why, and it's funny

In AN 10, vaggas 12-15,


The noble eightfold path, + 2 more factors right freedom and right knowledge, are referred to as "10 dharmas" several times in these 30 suttas.

Now the funny thing is, B. Sujato translates 'dhamma' 4 different ways in these 4 vaggas, all referring to those same 10 factors, within a span of a few suttas from each other.


112. Dutiyaasekhasutta
112. An Adept (2nd)
“Dasayime, bhikkhave, asekhiyā dhammā.
“monks, there are ten qualities of an adept.
Katame dasa?
What ten?
Asekhā sammādiṭṭhi, asekho sammāsaṅkappo, asekhā sammāvācā, asekho sammākammanto, asekho sammāājīvo, asekho sammāvāyāmo, asekhā sammāsati, asekho sammāsamādhi, asekhaṃ sammāñāṇaṃ, asekhā sammāvimutti—
An adept's right view, right thought, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right rememberfulness, right undistractible-lucidity, right knowledge, and right freedom.
ime kho, bhikkhave, dasa asekhiyā dhammā”ti.
These are the ten qualities of an adept.”    

122. Āsavakkhayasutta
122. The Ending of Defilements
“Dasayime, bhikkhave, dhammā bhāvitā bahulīkatā āsavānaṃ khayāya saṃvattanti.
“monks, these ten things, when developed and cultivated, lead to the ending of defilements.
Katame dasa?
What ten?
Sammādiṭṭhi, sammāsaṅkappo, sammāvācā, sammākammanto, sammāājīvo, sammāvāyāmo, sammāsati, sammāsamādhi, sammāñāṇaṃ, sammāvimutti—
Right view, right thought, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right rememberfulness, right undistractible-lucidity, right knowledge, and right freedom.
ime kho, bhikkhave, dasa dhammā bhāvitā bahulīkatā āsavānaṃ khayāya saṃvattantī”ti.
These ten things, when developed and cultivated, lead to the ending of defilements.”    


135. Ariyadhammasutta
135. The Teaching of the Noble Ones
“Ariyadhammañca vo, bhikkhave, desessāmi anariyadhammañca.
“monks, I will teach you the teaching of the noble ones, and what is not the teaching of the noble ones. …
Taṃ suṇātha … pe …
katamo ca, bhikkhave, anariyo dhammo?
And what is not the teaching of the noble ones?
Micchādiṭṭhi … pe … micchāvimutti—
Wrong view, wrong thought, wrong speech, wrong action, wrong livelihood, wrong effort, wrong rememberfulness, wrong undistractible-lucidity, wrong knowledge, and wrong freedom.
ayaṃ vuccati, bhikkhave, anariyo dhammo.
This is called what is not the teaching of the noble ones.
Katamo ca, bhikkhave, ariyo dhammo?
And what is the teaching of the noble ones?
Sammādiṭṭhi … pe … sammāvimutti—
Right view, right thought, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right rememberfulness, right undistractible-lucidity, right knowledge, and right freedom.
ayaṃ vuccati, bhikkhave, ariyo dhammo”ti.
This is called the teaching of the noble ones.”    


140. Sāvajjasutta
140. Blameworthy
“Sāvajjañca vo, bhikkhave, dhammaṃ desessāmi anavajjañca.
“I will teach you the blameworthy principle and the blameless principle. …
Taṃ suṇātha … pe …
katamo ca, bhikkhave, sāvajjo dhammo?
And what is the blameworthy principle?
Micchādiṭṭhi … pe … micchāvimutti—
Wrong view, wrong thought, wrong speech, wrong action, wrong livelihood, wrong effort, wrong rememberfulness, wrong undistractible-lucidity, wrong knowledge, and wrong freedom.
ayaṃ vuccati, bhikkhave, sāvajjo dhammo.
This is called the blameworthy principle.
Katamo ca, bhikkhave, anavajjo dhammo?
And what is the blameless principle?
Sammādiṭṭhi … pe … sammāvimutti—
Right view, right thought, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right rememberfulness, right undistractible-lucidity, right knowledge, and right freedom.
ayaṃ vuccati, bhikkhave, anavajjo dhammo”ti.
This is called the blameless principle.”    


It's not 'wrong' to translate it 4 ways like that, but...

there's a great English word in the dictionary for that, and it works much better.
The word is 'Dharma':

☸Dharma, dharma

(Oxford English Dictionary, curly brace{} comment added by me)
(1) {Dharma:} (in Indian religion) the eternal and inherent nature of reality, regarded in Hinduism as a cosmic law underlying right behaviour and social order.
(1.1) {☸Dharma:} (in Buddhism) the nature of reality regarded as a universal truth taught by the Buddha; the teaching of Buddhism.
(1.2) {dharma:} An aspect of truth or reality. ‘all dharmas are forms of emptiness’
Origin: Sanskrit, literally ‘decree or custom’.


There's already an accepted, widely used and understood English word, that straddles all 4 translations of 'principles, teachings, things, qualities', so why not use it?


Sunday, September 29, 2019

Every single vitakka reference in DN (20+ hits), linked to passage and sutta

DN (at least 20 of 34 suttas)

Every single vitakka reference in SN (128 hits), linked to passage and sutta


SN (128 sutta hits)